The Final Countdown

My finals are over!! Finally. (Haha bad puns.) Glad I don’t have to deal with them anymore, but it does mean that this semester is actually over. Considering I was supposed to be studying all last week, I did quite a bit. Knocked out a few good bucket list items.

I finally had conveyor belt sushi – something I’ve wanted to do forever, but it’s a little difficult when you’re eating vegetarian. They did have one of those yummy egg sushis though. Basically the way it works is sushi on small plates comes around on a conveyor belt and you take whatever you want. The cost of each plate depends on the color – that purple plate was my one splurge item. Crab and crab roe. Yummy. No, I did not eat all those plates by myself. I’m not that much of a fatty, I was with a friend!

I also took a ferry out to Cheung Chau for a day, one of the smaller islands in Hong Kong. There’s a small neighborhood and a couple beaches and trails. It’s actually so small that there aren’t any cars on the entire island! Everyone just gets around on bikes, even little old ladies. Most of them use training wheels though, which I thought was pretty adorable. Cheung Chau is where they have the bun festival every year, but that isn’t until spring. I don’t actually know much about it except that people climb up this gigantic structure covered in buns. It sounds pretty weird. The buns were delicious though! Just steamed bread with red bean inside, my favorite.

Like most tiny little islands, Cheung Chau also has amazing seafood. We had a gigantic meal of ginger crab, clams with bell peppers in some sort of gravy sauce, steamed shrimp, some kind of fish, and mantis shrimp. Mantis shrimp are also called pissing shrimp, and they’re sort of purplish inside. Really good but not worth all the effort it took to get their shells open.

Whenever I have a really great meal here I’m always shocked by how cheap everything is. All the seafood I could possibly stuff my face with, and so fresh. It came out to less than US$10 per person. Really, the little places with folding tables and plastic chairs are always the best.

On Saturday I went to Ozone, the highest bar in the world. It’s on the 118th floor of the Ritz Carlton in the ICC building.

Super swanky, super expensive. The view was really nice, but honestly I more just went so I could check it off the list. I had an unbelievably overpriced “dragontini,” which was delicious, and got really sad when I remembered I won’t be able to do any of this when I get back home. I don’t turn 21 until next August, so it’s all pretty miserable.

Sunday was probably my best day ever in Hong Kong. The plan was: wake up early to watch the live stream of the dance show at CMU, go to Tuen Mun where my local friend lives for a nice lunch, study, and then finish up with a free concert. I made it through the dance show (which was AWESOME guys, so proud of you! and so jealous I wasn’t in it this semester!), but then about ten minutes before I was going to leave for Tuen Mun I started feeling really sick. Spent the rest of the day going back and forth between sleeping and throwing up my guts. It was a fun time. I still don’t know what got me so sick, but I woke up on Monday feeling great again.

So that was my week, besides two finals and an essay. The next couple of weeks until I go home are going to be absolutely crazy, so I don’t know how much time I’ll have for blogging. I’m off to Taipei tomorrow, then Bangkok and back to mainland China before I leave Asia for good. Well, not for good, but for now at least. I’ll be back.

Someone Ate All the Buns

Last week I went to an absolutely amazing dim sum place in Mongkok. Definitely one of the best in Hong Kong. On a weeknight, we only had to wait a little over a half hour, but I tried to go again on Sunday afternoon and was told to come back in three hours.

This weekend a friend from school was here, so I got to be a cool local and show him around. We went to the observatory on the 100th floor of the ICC building, plus basically every market ever: ladies’ market, Fa Yuen market (well, what’s left of it after the fire last week), goldfish market, bird market, flower market, jade market, Temple Street night market… Lots of walking. And eating. I made a video, so instead of telling you about it, I’ll just show you.

This is the last week of classes, and I’m feeling pretty sad. I have 26 days until I go home, and 15 of those days will be spent in other countries. I don’t want to go home! I don’t want to leave this:

Most of all, I don’t want to go back to school and have to deal with snow.

Gobble Gobble

Happy Thanksgiving everyone! I made you a Google Doodle to celebrate!

It’s official – I go home in less than 40 days. The whole thing is pretty bittersweet. I miss home, my family, my friends, obviously, but I really could stay in Hong Kong forever. That being said… I have no Asian food to talk about this week! Terrible, I know. It’s not that I didn’t eat any, of course, just nothing blog-worthy. Although I did go back to that Japanese place, Miso Cool, and had some melt-in-your-mouth eel.

On Sunday I went to the horse races in Sha Tin. Since I obviously know absolutely nothing about horse races, I decided to bet on the horses with the coolest names: Dreams Maker and Forest Fountain. I wanted to bet on Super Pistachio, but that race wasn’t until much later in the day and we didn’t want to stay that long.

Well, Dreams Maker did not make my dreams. Neither did Forest Fountain. But I only bet about $5USD, so it was okay. The guys I was with did win, though, so of course they had to gloat.

On Monday I walked around TST looking for a new lens for my camera. Everything is all decorated for Christmas already! I swear, Christmas starts earlier every year. They’re building an ice skating rink right by the school, but I don’t understand how it will stay frozen since it’s outside. Outdoor ice skating rinks in Pittsburgh make sense. Pickwick in Burbank works because it’s inside. An outdoor rink in Hong Kong? How is that possible? Anyway, I walked all the way to Harbor City, a ridiculously expensive mall, and they had a huge Toy Story Christmas display. They Toy Story section of Disneyland just opened up a couple weeks ago, and I am so excited to go!

Of course, Christmastime doesn’t really start until after Thanksgiving. Depressed over missing out on a huge dinner, most of the Americans went last night to Outback Steakhouse, the most American restaurant within walking distance from the dorm (besides McDonald’s). It was the least Thanksgivingy Thanksgiving I have ever had, and it was great.

We got a Bloomin’ Onion, of course, which was inhaled in about three minutes.

Instead of my usual Tofurkey, I had shrimp and mushroom alfredo. That’s what the Pilgrims ate, right?

For dessert, no pumpkin pie. Instead, the Chocolate Thunder From Down Under, the most ridiculously named brownie a la mode ever. Also inhaled within 3 minutes.

It was a pretty great evening, I must say. Plus, in case you couldn’t tell, I got to use my new lens! It’s 50mm f/1.8. I’ve been having tons of fun with it. There are honestly about 3 camera shops per block in Hong Kong, so no shortage of new toys to buy… I might end up coming home with a couple more.

My Bucket List

School has forced me, and everyone else, into a routine. We’re not as adventurous as we used to be, and time is running out. I have less than two months left in Hong Kong, and multiple weekends will be spent out of town (read: I will be in Beijing in approximately 36 hours). Realizing this, a couple of friends and I have written a Hong Kong bucket list – things we absolutely have to do before we leave. It’s actually a pretty long list, but I think I can finish it. I just can’t have so many lazy days.

Last Wednesday (have I mentioned how much I love having no class on Wednesdays?) I went to Big Wave Bay, another beach on the island. It’s mostly for surfing, but since I’m not exactly pro after my one lesson in Santa Cruz and the waves were a lot bigger than they were that day (hence the name Big Wave), I decided instead to just lay out on the sand, read my book, and watch my friends surf. Fine by me, it was so relaxing. I still can’t believe I went to the beach in November… it’s even too cold at home for that.

That evening, a friend and I found a great pasta place for dinner, cheap and pretty close to the dorms. I eat noodles almost everyday, but I still find myself wishing I had pasta sometimes! I had spaghetti with pesto, chicken and mushrooms… Mmmm. We stopped at a little fruit stand along the way because my friend spotted rose apples, or jambos, which she used to eat all the time in Malaysia. I’d never seen anything like it before, so I got one at had it for breakfast the next day. It was like a really crisp, crunchy apple.

Friday I knocked out two items on the bucket list. My two co-authors and I went to Kowloon Park, over in Tsim Sha Tsui. It’s actually a pretty big park, with an aviary! We didn’t go in, though, so I’ll have to go back another day. It was really nice, but strange to be around so much green and see the skyscrapers in the background.

Eventually we found our way to a footbridge, and on the other side was the most beautiful sunset. We were looking straight out into the water, and you can see the whole island skyline. Seriously, the pictures can’t do it justice.

After that, we rushed over to the Ko Shan Theater in Hung Hom for a Cantonese opera! It was pretty good, and the costumes were amazing. It would have been even better, though, if it hadn’t been three and a half hours long. The story wasn’t even that complicated, they just took forever to say anything! It reminded me of when I read The Good Earth in ninth grade. It takes five minutes for the girl to say something as simple as “I’m cold,” and another five for the guy to say “me too.” Without all the fluff, that show would have been an hour and a half, tops. The whole thing was in Cantonese, but they had subtitles on screens on the sides of the stage. That was fine, except the screens randomly shut off for a couple minutes a few times… It’s funny how quickly you can get lost. Also, the three of us where both the whitest and youngest people in the whole theater. I’m pretty sure people were staring.

The show was called 一捧雪, A Handful of Snow. Basically some guys were fighting over a jade goblet called “A Handful of Snow,” while using the goblet to get at this girl whose name was 雪艷, Xueyan. The first character in her name means snow, so I felt pretty cool and knowledgable explaining the double meaning to my friends. Spoiler alert: Xueyan ends up killing the bad guy while yelling “STAB, STAB, STAB!” It was pretty funny.

On Saturday I had a lazy day. I didn’t feel like doing homework, and I really wanted to go outside, so I decided to take a walk to the water. It was such a nice day, and the view of the skyline was absolutely clear. There’s a bit of grass, some benches, and a little boardwalk all along the water, so I took my book and read for a couple of hours. I wish I had a place like this back at school where I could do homework… not that we have the weather for it, anyway.

On Sunday, I finally got to try congee. I can’t believe I’ve been in Hong Kong for over two months and I haven’t had it yet! Wikipedia says it’s the same thing as jook, which my mom makes, but this seemed different. Maybe it’s just been too long since I ate meat for me to remember. Mom, I know you are reading this – is congee the same thing as the jook you make? Anyway, congee is rice porridge, and you eat it with this delicious fried dough stuff.

I got PUMPKIN congee with corn and pork. Yes. Pumpkin. Pretty much the first pumpkin food I’ve had all fall! It wasn’t exactly pumpkin pie, but it was good. Ugh, I could really go for some pumpkin pie now. I’m really sad I’m going to miss Thanksgiving. Best food of the year besides Christmas, and I’m missing that too. Someone, please make stuffing and sweet potatoes for me when I get home. I will love you forever.

Hong Kong Halloween

Two weekends since my last post! I’m terrible. Sorry Mom. I’ve been way too busy being a good girl, doing homework and studying.

Last Friday I went to Shek O, on Hong Kong Island, which is pretty much the best beach in all of Hong Kong. Man, I love not having class on Fridays. Getting there isn’t even that bad, just a couple of buses.

It was such a perfect day. The sun was shining but it wasn’t too hot, there were hardly any people, the water was warm, the sand was unbelievably soft. Honestly, I could have laid right down on the sand instead of my towel and it would have been just as comfortable. Out in the water, they’ve got these huge raft things, so we swam out there and just sat for awhile. It was so relaxing! I really need to take advantage of this weather while I can and go back.

There are a few little restaurants right by where the bus lets you off, and we decided on a little Thai place called Happy Garden. I was pretty stoked, since it had been awhile since I had Thai and that’s pretty much my favorite. I got red curry, my favorite food ever, and it was aaaaamazing. Full of eggplant, green beans, bell peppers – everything I love. I was in heaven. Seriously, perfect day.

A couple weeks ago, I came across something called a hotchocspoon. My Dutch friend was all excited, because it’s made by a Dutch company; basically it’s a huge chunk of chocolate stuck on a spoon that you melt into hot milk to make the most amazing hot chocolate ever created. I made it the other night while I was studying for a (super dumb/easy) midterm…. so delicious. Apparently they make like 75 different flavors – the store where I saw it had maybe 20, but it was still a huge decision. They have regular things like milk, dark, hazelnut, but also crazy flavors like green tea, blackberry, tiramisu, and cardamom. Then they have ones with alcohol in them! It’s got a little plastic bulb of alcohol that gets released as the chocolate melts – what a cool idea! I finally settled on orange and Cointreau.

It was dark chocolate with pieces of candied orange peel, with just enough Cointreau to give it a really nice orange flavor without overpowering the richness of the chocolate. Seriously the best hot chocolate I have ever had.

On Friday, I decided to do some more solo exploring of the city. I went to Soho, which, in Hong Kong, means south of Hollywood Road. It’s a pretty trendy hipster-type area, with plenty of overpriced boutiques, but also a handful of super cool vintage stores. I didn’t end up buying anything, but there was some pretty cool stuff to look at – old suitcases, 1970′s Dior sunglasses, battered leather boots and rotary phones. I thought vintage stores in Hong Kong might be a bit different, but honestly they had pretty much the same stuff we’ve got at home.

Enter stage left: Halloween. I’ve been hearing nonstop about how Halloween is such a big deal in Hong Kong, which I wasn’t expecting. Everyone says, “They go crazy here!” “Professional costumes and makeup!” “It’s insane!!” That was only party true. Saturday night, we head over to Lan Kwai Fong, the area full of bars and clubs that’s usually all foreigners. There were plenty of locals that night, sure, but not to celebrate. They come to gawk at the crazy white people wearing costumes.

I went as Buzz Lightyear, and I felt like a celebrity. Literally, I couldn’t walk anywhere without being completely bombarded by cameras. Everyone wants a picture of you or with you. At first, it was kind of funny and cool, but after awhile it was really just annoying. They walk up to you and shove cameras in your face! The worst is the people with kids. It’s a few streets of just bars and drunk people, and parents bring their little kids and ask you to take pictures with them. Sure, they look adorable, but they should not be in Lan Kwai Fong on a Saturday night.

They trick-or-treat, but completely backwards. Little boys would come up to me, say “trick-or-treat!” and then hand me a piece of candy from their bag. I have no idea how or why that tradition got changed, but it was very strange to experience.

Sunday was a day to relax. For dinner, I tried out a place close to the dorm called King of Noodles. I will definitely be going back – it was so cheap, and they had fish cake. Not the super artificial pink kind, either, but the good stuff.

The only thing I really like about eating meat again is being able to have everything I loved as a kid. That means fish cake, cha siu bao, duck, dried squid, and siu mai. Especially siu mai. I really have a problem with that stuff, especially the fish kind you can get on the street. They are seriously the best snack. I found a place really close by that sells siu mai and all sorts of other street food until 3am… very dangerous. I will really have to limit my midnight snack intake. That stuff is too delicious.

I really can’t believe it’s almost November. I go home in exactly two months… how depressing. I want these next two months to go by so slowly, but I know they’ll fly by just like September and October did. Le sigh. I don’t want to leave.

Hung Sweet Hom

I had a really traumatic incident yesterday. I was at the grocery store, casually looking at some apples, when a fish committed suicide. It somehow knocked the top off of the tank and jumped out onto the floor. It was a pretty huge fish, too. I really wonder how often it happens, because the workers really had no idea what to do, but they weren’t exactly scared, either. I, on the other hand, was screaming bloody murder. It flopped around pretty violently on the floor for at least three minutes before the people could catch it, and by that time it was dead. So depressing.

Anyway, now that I’ve gotten that out of my system… I took it pretty easy this past weekend. I had a couple of midterms this week, in networks and Chinese, so not tons of free time. On Saturday I walked around the goldfish market in Mong Kok, which was pretty cool. It’s a full block of shops selling fish and turtles and any of your other aquarium needs. A lot of the fish are in tanks, but there were also racks and racks of bags of fish! I felt pretty bad for them, but hopefully the ones in bags are the ones that sell quickly. Those fish shouldn’t be cooped up like that for so long.

On Sunday I went to the Kowloon Walled City Park, which was very beautiful. Kowloon used to be a fort, and the park sits where that used to be. The original south gate of the fort is there, which is pretty cool. Going there just made me wish we had parks like that at home…

Tonight, I went out for dinner with a friend, and then we stopped at a bubble pancake place. I’ve had those a few times, but this time I decided to get a “Hong Kong Style Waffle.” It was heavenly. The waffle was really eggy and soft, freshly made. They fold it in half and in the inside they put peanut butter, condensed milk, margarine, and sugar. Talk about sweet! It was seriously to die for, and so cheap. I’m gonna have to try really hard not to go back there all the time.

That’s pretty much it for this week. Since I didn’t do much, I thought I’d explain a little more about the area where I live, Hung Hom, and just Hong Kong in general. Here are some differences between Hong Kong and home.

Cars
There are two kinds of buses here: the regular public buses, which are all double-deckers, and the “light” buses, which are teeny and only seat 16 people. The light buses usually cost more, but since there are fewer people they stop less often and usually get you where you want to go much faster.

Hong Kong is too crowded for cars. Besides buses, you really only see taxis, delivery trucks, and expensive cars. Seriously, almost everyone who drives has a Mercedes or a BMW. Bentleys and Maseratis aren’t uncommon either. You do see some more affordable makes, too, like Toyota, but they’re all within a couple of years old. No ’98 Camrys here. And definitely no Karmann Ghias.

Exchange rate
The exchange rate confuses me. It’s approximately 1 US dollar to 8 Hong Kong dollars, but you can’t buy anything for a dollar here. In a cheap market, you can get clothes for like $50, but in a real mall they cost anywhere from $200 to $1000, and stores like H&M are a little more expensive here than they are at home. At the same time, a pair of Nikes will only run you about $500-600. A cheap dinner will cost $30-$40, and dinner at a nicer place will be at least over $100. A drink at Starbucks is maybe $35, but you can get a giant flavored milk tea with boba for $15. It’s really strange how some things are much, much cheaper, but other things cost more.

Eating
Another thing about restaurants: a lot of the time, I eat in a mall food court on the walk back from school or one of the infinitely many hole-in-the-wall places nearby. None of those places give paper napkins; you have to bring your own. If you want free napkins, you have to go either to an American fast food chain or a real restaurant with a hostess and everything. Not necessarily a fancy restaurant, just a real one. I haven’t been anywhere with cloth napkins, either. Plus, you never ever tip the waiters.

Food is different here. I don’t just mean the types of dishes, but just how they describe it. Whatever you read on the menu is EXACTLY what you get. If it says “rice and beef,” you get white rice with beef. Never expect vegetables unless they are explicitly mentioned, because 9 times out of 10 you will be disappointed.

Cellphone picture of "fried noodles with mushrooms" from the school canteen. How many mushrooms do you see? Because I only see one. This was a bad dinner.

Things are a little different at supermarkets too. You know how lots of foods at home say things like “added blahblahblah” or “great for blahblahblah”? Like, how the blue orange juice carton is always “plus calcium and vitamin D”? They don’t put any of that stuff, and black it out with Sharpie on the imported items. I have no idea why, but I can usually read what it says through the marker anyway.

Nutrition facts are different, too. It will still tell you what the serving size is, but the calorie counts and everything else is all based on 100g. So, that means, even if there’s only 40g in the package, it will trick you into thinking you’ve just eaten 750 calories because that’s how many are in 100g. Plus, sometimes they’ll randomly put it in kilojoules instead of calories. Who knows what a kilojoule is? I sure don’t. It’s all very confusing. Speaking of strange units, fruit is priced by the pound, but everything else is metric.

Pretty much everywhere, but especially in Hung Hom, there are little corner markets for fruit. You can get fruit at the big supermarkets too, of course, but it seems like the locals go to these little places more often. They have a very farmers’ market feel, until you see the stickers on the fruit saying they’re all grown in California or Florida. New Zealand, sometimes, too. But they’ve got all sorts of fruits – regular ones like apples, bananas, grapes, and oranges, but also dragon fruit, starfruit, and pomelo. They usually sell chestnuts, too.

The picture on the left is sort of a dry goods store – I don’t know what else to call it. They usually have a sign that says 茶, tea, so my guess is they’ve got loose tea in some of those huge crates. They also have lots of nuts and dried beans and that sort of thing. These are everywhere.

Shopping
Most clothes here are one size only, and you can’t try anything on. Only real stores have dressing rooms, and by that I mean they have an actual cash register instead of a calculator and an envelope, and the clothes have tags on them, sometimes even with barcodes. Sometimes. The one-size clothes stores only keep one of each thing out, and if you want to buy it, they run into the back closet and come out with a little plastic baggy with your shirt or whatever inside. Can you believe that? All the clothes are packaged, like when you order them online. I don’t know why they keep it packaged that way, but it’s always strange to unwrap my clothes from a little plastic bag.

Also, every subway station is a shopping mall. I don’t know how else to explain it. Most of them are in the basement of a multistory mall, and the ones that aren’t still have tons of stores and are probably within a 2 minute walk from a mall. Hong Kong has more malls than anywhere I’ve ever been in my entire life.

Backpacks
Girls don’t wear backpacks here. I showed up on the first day of school with my Google backpack, feelin’ supafly, and people are staring at me like I’ve got my pants on backwards.

Me on the first day of school.

The girls always either hold their books or put them in some gigantic “purse” that really has no business being so large. A lot of guys even carry messenger bags! I felt pretty stupid until I got to my computer networks class, where my backpack gave me the instant cool factor. I am always the coolest geek in the room.

Leap of Faith

We all survived the typhoon, hurray! The rain wasn’t even that bad, it just got really windy. A couple of trees near the dorm fell over, but that’s all. Another one is supposed to be coming, I think, but I think it’s going to stay even farther away from Hong Kong than the last one did.

On Friday, after all the typhoon business blew over (hahaha) I went hiking on MacLehose trail, near Sai Kung. It was a perfect day for hiking: warm, but a little cloudy so the sun wasn’t beating down on us. We got caught in a bit of rain toward the end, but it was okay. The trail is over in New Territories, and has some of the most beautiful scenery I’ve ever seen.

It takes a little over an hour to get to Sai Wan beach, but the trail is super easy – just like the last time I went hiking, it’s a paved sidewalk almost the whole way. Sai Wan is also beautiful, and split in two parts by a big section of rocks. It’s pretty strange – one side is very clean, but the other side has trash all over the sand. It probably washes up there from other beaches or people dumping from boats… really sad.

After the beach, we veered off the path to get to what we were really looking for: Sheung Luk Stream. It’s got a couple pools, but the one at the very top is both the cleanest and the deepest.

If you climb up to the top of the rocks, the jump is about 20 feet. It took me a bit of convincing, but eventually I mustered up the courage to do it. Oh my god, it was amazing. The water was cool and refreshing, and I got such an adrenaline rush from the jump! Afterward I just kept saying over and over again, “I can’t believe I just jumped off a cliff.” Then I did it again.

To cancel out all of that physical activity, I had plenty of desserts this weekend. On Saturday, I went for dumplings with a local friend, and then afterward we got dessert. He went for grass jelly with fruit, while I chose what translates to “ice flower.” It’s sort of like halfway between ice cream and shave ice. So light and refreshing! I got strawberry, but they also had mango, chocolate, durian, and Yakult. The place was right by school, so I will definitely be going back.

After that – FIREWORKS. October 1st is China’s National Day, and Hong Kong had the most amazing fireworks display I’ve ever seen in Victoria Harbor. Seriously, the entire sky was filled with fireworks for 20 minutes straight. I’ve never seen anything like it! They even had fireworks that formed the characters 中国 (China), but I couldn’t get a good picture. Apparently they spent something like $8,000,000HKD on the whole thing. Crazy. Also, the whole area by the water was PACKED. Seriously, the sidewalks were completely full and they even closed down the streets so we could stand there, it was insane!

Have you ever heard of rice pizza? Me neither. Today I went with a friend to a mall in Sha Tin and we had rice pizza for dinner. It’s literally just pizza but with rice instead of crust. She had been there before, but I had no idea what I was in store for. It was really good! One of the most interesting things I’ve ever eaten. And not nearly as filling or fatty as regular pizza, either. We got one with salmon and mushrooms, and one with chicken and mango. The salmon one was kind of cheesy, but I don’t think the chicken one had any cheese at all! I liked that one better. Mostly just because I love anything with mango. I couldn’t figure out how they get the rice to stay like that, though, because it’s not super sticky or crunchy or anything. Food mysteries.

After we stuffed our faces with the rice pizza, we walked around the mall until we were hungry again for dessert! We went to Honeymoon (not the same one as last time) and it was soooo delicious. I think other people had the same idea as us, because that place was hoppin. Seriously, the rest of the mall was pretty empty by that time, but Honeymoon was packed. Everyone wants dessert!

We got a “mango pancake,” which was a little dumpling-type thing with fresh mango and whipped cream inside, an icy sago soup with fresh mango, bananas, lychee jelly, and green tea ice cream (I love their green tea ice cream!!), and warm peanut/sesame tangyuan in black sesame and walnut soups. In the picture on the menu, the bowl is split diagonally with half black sesame soup and half walnut. I think they were rushing a little in the kitchen since it was so busy, so unfortunately our soup came a little bit mixed together. It still tasted great, but I really wanted to taste the walnut soup on its own! There’s always next time, I guess – makes for a great excuse to get more dessert!

I’m gonna come home super fat if I don’t slow it down with these desserts. Seriously.